NUMBER TWO: FIBER IS YOUR FRIEND AND ENEMY

Want to lose 5 pounds in two days? Eat fiber. Lots of fiber. Then even more fiber.  Just make sure your toilet works and you have a lot of toilet paper.

You’ll feel much better and lose weight fairly quickly, however, the side effect is going to bathroom to drop the deuce. “Drop the deuce” is a polite way of saying “number 2”, which is a polite way of saying “going to the can”, which is a polite way of saying “going potty” which is a polite way of saying “taking a s*it.”

Just remember that you’ll be removing all the stuff in your lower intestine (also called you colon) that’s been in there for days, weeks, months and sometimes years. It won’t be pretty. YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

The best way to consume fiber is to have a salad at lunch and dinner. Have lots of leafy greens in your salad, not just iceberg lettuce. For maximum fiber overload add chick peas, black beans or red kidney beans to your salad.

Another good way to get fiber is to eat apples and pears. These fruits are loaded with fiber and make sure you eat the skin too. Oatmeal and other whole wheat cereals are also loaded with fiber.

Don’t like greens? Don’t like oatmeal? Don’t like apples? You’re only option is to add psyllium husk to your diet.  Add 1 tablespoon of psyllium husk to a glass of lemonade and drink.

From Wikicrapia

Psyllium seed husks also known as ispaghula, isabgol, or simply as psyllium, are portions of the seeds of the plant Plantago ovata, (genus Plantago), a native of India and Pakistan. They are soluble in water, expanding and becoming mucilaginous when wet.

Psyllium seed husks are indigestible in human beings and are often used as a source of dietary fiber. They are used to relieve constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticular disease, and diarrhea. They are also used as a regular dietary supplement to improve and maintain regular GI transit. The inert bulk of the husks helps provide a constant volume of solid material irrespective of other aspects of the diet or any disease condition of the gut. Some recent research is also showing them to be promising in lowering cholesterol and controlling diabetes.

Other uses include gluten-free baking, where ground psyllium seed husks bind moisture and help make the bread less crumbly.

The husks are used whole in their natural state, or dried and chopped or powdered for easier consumption. In either of these forms, one takes them by mixing them with water or another fluid.

Flax seed is another good choice instead of psyllium husk. Again from wikicrapia:

Flax seeds come in two basic varieties: (1) brown; and (2) yellow or golden. Most types have similar nutritional characteristics and equal amounts of short-chain omega-3 fatty acids. The exception is a type of yellow flax called Linola or solin, which has a completely different oil profile and is very low in omega-3. Although brown flax can be consumed as readily as yellow, and has been for thousands of years, it is better known as an ingredient in paints, fiber and cattle feed. Flax seeds produce a vegetable oil known as flaxseed or linseed oil, which is one of the oldest commercial oils and solvent-processed flax seed oil has been used for centuries as a drying oil in painting and varnishing.

One hundred grams of ground flax seed supplies about 450 kilo-calories, 41 grams of fat, 28 grams of fiber, and 20 grams of protein.

Psyllium seed husks also known as ispaghula, isabgol, or simply as psyllium, are portions of the seeds of the plant Plantago ovata, (genus Plantago), a native of India and Pakistan. They are soluble in water, expanding and becoming mucilaginous when wet.

Psyllium seed husks are indigestible in human beings and are often used as a source of dietary fiber. They are used to relieve constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticular disease, and diarrhea. They are also used as a regular dietary supplement to improve and maintain regular GI transit. The inert bulk of the husks helps provide a constant volume of solid material irrespective of other aspects of the diet or any disease condition of the gut. Some recent research is also showing them to be promising in lowering cholesterol and controlling diabetes.[1]

Other uses include gluten-free baking, where ground psyllium seed husks bind moisture and help make the bread less crumbly.

The husks are used whole in their natural state, or dried and chopped or powdered for easier consumption. In either of these forms, one takes them by mixing them with water or another fluid. Sometimes they are combined with clay as a detoxification drink. (“Questionable Cancer Therapies”, Barrie R Cassileth, PhD)[2] They are also available in capsules. Over-the-counter laxatives and fiber supplements such as Metamucil, Colon Cleanse, Serutan, Fybogel, Bonvit, and Effersyllium have psyllium husks as their main ingredient. They may be combined with other ingredients (e.g., Blackstrap molasses is sometimes used with psyllium seed husks for its high mineral and vitamin content, as well as being an excellent carrier). A typical dose is one to three teaspoons per glass of water. Psyllium seeds can be used for the same purpose at a lower cost.

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